This book is about a neglected and taboo slice of history: the postwar allegations of individual Jews and Jewish communities against fellow Jews who, they believed, had collaborated with the Nazis during the war. Jewish honor courts were secular initiatives of Jewish communities and survivor organizations to adjudicate these conflicts and either exonerate defendants or mete out punishments to those found guilty. Unlike state courts, in which state prosecutors filed criminal charges against alleged collaborators, the honor courts applied the moral standard of whether a defendant had “betrayed the trust of the Jewish people” and should be deemed a “traitor to the Jewish nation” (p. 5). After the war, honor courts emerged in several countries throughout Europe and in the nascent state of Israel. Jewish communal leaders believed that only Jews should sit in judgment of the wartime behavior of fellow Jews—that only...

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