Less than two weeks before Adolf Hitler's failed putsch in Munich on 8−9 November 1923, the weekly Heimatland, officially the press organ of the “Deutsche Kampfbund” but also a paper closely related to the embryonic Nazi Party, called on its front page for the establishment of an “Ankara government” in Germany (“Her die Angora-Regierung!”). The paper argued that the revival of Germany could start only far away from the capital, in Bavaria, just as the Turkish nationalists of Mustafa Kemal (after 1934 Atatürk) had started their resistance movement against the imposed peace treaty of Sèvres from faraway Ankara, and not the former imperial capital of Constantinople (p. 88). During his trial, Hitler—who had already praised Mustafa Kemal in 1922—affirmed this view: “Not from the rotten center, from Constantinople, could salvation come. This city was, just as in our case, contaminated by democratic-pacifistic,...

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