From a global justice perspective, two objectives are desirable with regard to international labour policies: one is to protect the rights of migrant workers, and the other is to remove the restrictions that impede international migration, in particular for low-skilled migrants. Martin Ruhs, who teaches political economy in the University of Oxford, argues that these two objectives are conflicting, in particular in high-income countries. This is to say that, ceteris paribus, rich countries are more likely to be willing to host more migrant workers if the cost of hosting them is lower—in particular if they are less constrained to protect the rights of migrant workers. Through a rich discussion of existing labour migration policies, The Price of Rights unfolds an inspiring analysis, with significant insights from the ‘law and economics’ tradition. It...

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