Abstract

Despite the diversity of morphology and ecology in members of the Canidae, social behavior remains similar throughout the Family. Some specializations have occurred in groupliving species, serving to maintain group cohesion and to reduce intraspecific aggression, and these changes in behaviors and postures have been ones of degree rather than kind. The type of specialization differs in each species and is probably related to its ecology. Thus, the bateared fox has developed contact behaviors such as social grooming while the wolf has evolved more specialized agonistic postures that are used in the maintenance of a social hierarchy.