In recent years diasporas have become portrayed as newly emerging actors in the international arena. This “‘discovery’ of expatriate populations” (Larner 2007:334) involved a growing number of state, nonstate, and international institutions reaching out to diasporas, increased expatriate organizing, and a certain institutionalization of diaspora activities. Diasporas are portrayed as development actors, transnational investors, trade and tourism promoters, political activists, peace brokers, and conflict instigators. Yet, none of these activities of expatriate populations are particularly new. Why is it then that diasporas have been “discovered” and promoted as actors in international affairs only recently?

...

Much existing literature conceptualizes the recent involvement of diasporas in terms of individual states' decisions to reach out to their diasporas as an instrument of foreign policy (Shain and Barth 2003; Brinkerhoff 2008; Gamlen 2008). Thereby, the state is often posited as the starting point...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.