Everyday in Washington, DC, tourists gather outside the fence that divides E Street from the south lawn of the White House.1 Most are interested in taking pictures featuring the structure’s rounded portico beyond the sweeping lawn, as landscape architect Frederick (Rick) Law Olmsted, Jr. anticipated when he said in 1935 that it was “vitally important … to maintain in perpetuity an unobstructed and satisfying view into the White House Grounds” from the south (Olmsted Brothers 8). Olmsted had served on the Senate Park Commission, which Congress had charged in 1902 with redesigning the capital’s National Mall and public grounds as “the visible expression of the power and taste of the people of the United States” (US Senate 19). Commission members...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.