The three excellent books reviewed in this essay all, in different ways, challenge conventional understandings of how and what we study within International Political Economy (IPE)—emphasizing the role of everyday social relations, actions, and the perspectives of nonelite groups and actors in the making of the global political economy. Of the three books reviewed here, only one of the books specifically locates itself within the field of IPE and engages specifically with an IPE literature (Hobson and Seabrooke's collection Everyday Politics of the World Economy). However, the other two books that are written from the perspective of social anthropology (Nevins and Peluso's collection Taking Southeast Asia to Market) and labor/industrial sociology (Munoz's Transnational Tortillas) should rightfully be considered within a review essay focussing on the topic of “everyday IPE” in the sense that they are representative of literature that explores the interconnectedness...

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