The discourse and structures of international justice have expanded rapidly since the early 1990s, when the United Nations Security Council established the ad hoc international criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. This expansion is symbolized by the permanent International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, while reflecting broader developments including the extension of international law and global governance, the mobilization of transnational human rights movements, and the proliferation of transitional justice mechanisms, such as criminal prosecutions and truth commissions. The books reviewed here convey both the growing interest in the subject of international justice across the social sciences and the changing nature of dilemmas that preoccupy scholars and practitioners in this dynamic field. They represent critical contributions to our theoretical and empirical understanding of international justice in the post-Cold War era and offer insightful analysis of its promise and limits. Writing in the...

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