Michel Hogue's book is a welcome addition to the literature on Canadian métis and the westward expansion of Canada and the United States during the nineteenth century. While the Canadian métis literature often glosses the métis of the parkland and plains as a single entity, Hogue interprets them as distinctive populations, with different cultural, economic, and political dynamics. His goal is to show how evolving métis identities were intertwined with those of Native Americans and First Nations peoples and with constraints imposed by the two developing nation-states, especially their preoccupations with race and national borders. He provides a nuanced and multilayered approach to cultural definitions of plains métis and shows how both nation-states tried to eliminate such complexity by establishing fixed race-based identities that...

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