Learning to code is a charged topic in digital history. Some scholars, leaning on the poles of digital history's “big tent” ethos, insist that learning to program is an unnecessary barrier to entry and rightly point out that one can do digital history without writing a single line of code. Yet the field also holds up coding as a gold standard, the pinnacle of technical achievement. One can easily find software and Web sites, as well as research in the field that used to be called humanities computing, to show how historians who program have influenced the profession. Such debates have a much broader context. Scientists, too, are sorting out how programming fits in their research and graduate programs. Learning to code is also an issue in K–12 education, with even President Barack Obama claiming that “everybody's got to learn how to code early” and backing it up by writing...

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