Just in time for the bicentennial of Abraham Lincoln's birth, David W. Bulla has provided a study of a darker side of the Lincoln presidency. A major outbreak of censorship in Indiana orchestrated by Brig. Gen. Milo Smith Hascall in 1863 led to suppression or intimidation of eleven northern Indiana newspapers. Hascall, too often overlooked in accounts of Civil War censorship, gets extensive and much-needed treatment here.

Bulla, an assistant professor of journalism at Iowa State University, follows Fredrick S. Siebert's argument in Freedom of the Press in England: 1476–1776 (1952): freedom contracts and government restraints increase as stresses on the stability of society and on the government increase (p. 244). The First Amendment did not apply to states in the nineteenth century and was ignored by the national government, especially in time of civil war. The Indiana constitution protected the press, but diluted that protection with a responsibility-for-abuse clause....

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