Abstract

Consumers rated several qualitative attributes of ground beef that framed the beef as either “75% lean” or “25% fat.” The consumers' evaluations were more favorable toward the beef labeled “75% lean” than that labeled “25% fat.” More importantly, the magnitude of this information framing effect lessened when consumers actually tasted the meat. We discuss these results in terms of an averaging model, which suggests that a diagnostic product experience dilutes the impact of information framing.

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