Since the Chinese Anti-Monopoly Law (AML) entry into force in 2008, the commitment decision as an alternative to an infringement decision has been established for use by the Anti-monopoly Enforcement Authorities (AMEAs) in putting an end to anticompetitive conduct. As Article 45 of the AML1 stipulates, if the AMEA deems the commitments offered by an undertaking adequately address the identified competitive concerns, the AMEA shall suspend the investigation, which means it may put a long investigatory process to an end without establishing the illegality of the conduct and without imposing a fine on it. The purpose of commitment decisions is to increase procedural efficiency, which represents ‘a rapid solution’2 for bringing anticompetitive behaviour to an end and restoring effective competition to the relevant market. So Article 45 of the AML emphasises...

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