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Antonio Cassese Prize

Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies

In 2009, the Journal of International Criminal Justice established the Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies. This biennial prize will award €15,000 (fifteen thousand euro) to the author of the most original and innovative paper published in the Journal in the two years preceding the award. The aim is to enable the winner to undertake a research or publication project, or further studies in the field of international criminal law (including aspects relating to human rights, humanitarian law issues, as well as substantive and procedural law matters).

This award does not replace the Journal of International Criminal Justice Prize which is awarded annually by the Journal and Oxford University Press. Those who have received or will receive the Journal of International Criminal Justice Prize may also be considered for the award of the new prize.

All contributors to the Journal are eligible for the award, irrespective of their age. Preference may, however, be given to emerging authors and other persons at the beginning or at a turning point in their career. Members, or past members of the Board of Editors and the Advisory Board of the Journal cannot be considered for award, while past or current members of the Editorial Committee will be considered as eligible.

The selection will be made by the Board of Editors. Authors, when their papers are published in the Journal , should let the Board know whether they are interested in being considered for the prize.

A short-list of the best articles published during the two years for which the award is being made will be drawn up by the Board of Editors of the Journal . The short-listed authors will then be invited to submit a research proposal to be completed within two years of reception of the grant. The research proposal submitted may be part of a larger project, or could consist of a proposal for funding studies at a masters or doctoral degree level (or equivalent). It could also propose an individual project designed to lead to a major work (book or article or report). The Board of Editors may choose not to award the prize and hold it over for a subsequent year if in its view the papers or projects submitted do not reach the standards required.

The Board is pleased to announce that 2011 onwards, the prize bursary is increased to €15,000, an increase by €5,000 over the grant originally envisaged in the instituting of the award. The winner will receive the prize in two instalments, €5,000 in the first instance and the rest on completion of a significant part of the project, or in two years’ time, whichever is to come first.

Winner of the Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies (2013-2014)

The Board of Editors is very pleased to award the Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies for 2013–2014 to Lorna McGregor, Professor in the Law School and Director of the Human Rights Centre, Essex University, United Kingdom.

The Board wishes to commend Professor McGregor for her contributions to public international law, to the pages of the Journal , and especially for her essay on ‘State Immunity and Human Rights: Is there a Future after Germany v. Italy ?' , which is now freely available to read online. For further detail about the 2013-2014 Antonio Cassese Prize, you can read the full Editorial .

Winner of the Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies (2011-2012)

We are happy to report on a small ceremony that took place at the European University Institute in Florence at the end of May, where, in the presence of Silvia Cassese, peers and friends, Darryl Robinson was awarded the Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies.

Darryl was awarded the Prize on account of his contributions to the Journal and the thought provoking research project which he is undertaking on international criminal law as justice.

Darryl has submitted a research proposal, “International Criminal Law as Justice”, which is freely available to read here .

Darryl Robinson


Winner of the Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies (2009-2010)

The Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies (2009-2010) was awarded to Sandesh Sivakumaran for his excellent contributions to the Journal , including the ground-breaking ‘Courts of Armed Opposition Groups: Fair Trials or Summary Justice?’ 7 JICJ (2009) 489-513 and ‘War Crimes before the Special Court for Sierra Leone: Child Soldiers, Hostages, Peacekeepers and Collective Punishments’, 8 JICJ (2010) 1009-1034, and to facilitate the completion of his research on ‘The International Law of Internal Conflict’.

In awarding the prize, the Board wished to recognize Mr Sivakumaran’s contribution to an area of law of immense contemporary and practical relevance. The members commended his timely research, innovative approach and lucid analysis and look forward to the publication of the monograph which, it is hoped, will form the standard volume on the contentious issue of the status and conduct of internal war in international public and criminal law.

In order to mark the award both of the Journal of International Criminal Justice Prize (2010) and the second Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies (2009-2010), a ceremony took place in Villa Moynier in Geneva, at the Geneva Academy for Humanitarian Law and Human Rights, on Thursday, 10 March 2011. Sandesh Sivakumaran and the winners, ex aequo , of the Journal of International Criminal Justice Prize, Dr. Shane Darcy and Mr Johan David Michels, received the prizes, bursary and certificate, from Judge Baltasar Garzón, magistrate at the Audiencia Nacional , Spain.

‘Courts of Armed Opposition Groups: Fair Trials or Summary Justice?’ 7 JICJ (2009) 489-513
Winner of the La Pira Prize in 2009
Read the full article here .

Winner of the Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies (2003-2008)

On Tuesday, 18 February 2010, the inaugural Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Law Studies (2003-2008) was awarded to James G. Stewart for his many excellent contributions to the Journal , including ‘Rethinking Guantanamo: Unlawful Confinement as Applied to International Criminal Law’, and to further the completion of his research project, ‘Atrocity, Commerce, and Accountability: The International Criminal Liability of Corporate Actors’. In making the award the Board of the Journal duly emphasised the merits of the research project which it felt drew together recent developments in international criminal justice with intelligence and insight, and which it is hoped will make an important contribution to the ongoing debate on the attribution of criminal liability in international law.

In order to mark the inaugural award, a small ceremony was organized in Villa Moynier, the new seat of the Geneva Academy for Humanitarian Law and Human Rights, where amidst friends and colleagues, James Stewart received the prize, a bursary and a certificate, from Salvatore Zappalà, co-Managing Editor of the Journal. The evening was presided over by Cornelio Sommaruga, Chair of Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining, and former President of the International Committee of the Red Cross. He was assisted at the event by Andrew Clapham, Director of the Geneva Academy, and Paola Gaeta, Director of the Academy’s Masters Programme. The Editor-in-chief, Antonio Cassese, participated in the ceremony through a web camera connection.

In his key note speech, Cornelio Sommaruga addressed the current state of international humanitarian law, stressing his concern over the regular failure to respect the principle of distinction. Furthermore Mr Sommaruga addressed the question of the possible need for new codification. While Mr Sommaruga reflected on the success of the last two decades in creating new instruments of international humanitarian law, such as the banning of anti personnel mines, he stressed the concern shared by many that ‘when you open up a body of law you don’t know what you’ll find’. Lastly, the speaker praised the role of initiatives such as the Cassese Prize as a welcome means of encouraging talent in the field of international law.

‘Atrocity, Commerce, and Accountability: The International Criminal Liability of Corporate Actors’ 8 JIJC (2010) 313-326
Read the full article here .

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