The Morality of Freedom (MF) has become so well known for philosophical doctrines on a range of different issues—the nature of authority and its justification, the argument against the exclusion of ideals, the interest theory of rights, the rejection of egalitarianism—that it is easy to lose sight of the overall argument of the book, and the role these individual doctrines play in supporting it. This is, of course, to defend a conception of political freedom within the liberal tradition, which is neither individualist in nature nor anti-perfectionist in spirit, and which is rooted not in a concern about limiting the ability of governments to interfere in the lives of their subjects, but rather in a recognition of the intrinsic value of personal autonomy, and the fact that...

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