I am honored to be this year’s recipient of the Monroe G. Sirken Award in Interdisciplinary Survey Methods Research. Monroe played a key role in fostering research on survey methods while at the National Center for Health Statistics, where he established the first laboratory for research on cognitive aspects of survey methodology (CASM). Perhaps even more important, he was instrumental in providing mechanisms through which research on survey methods could be supported by grants from other statistical agencies through the National Science Foundation’s program on survey methods, currently known as Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics (directed by Cheryl Eavey).

In this talk, I try to do three things. First, I indulge in some personal reminiscences about the Golden Age, when proposals were less numerous...

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