Since 2010 and the work published by Tängden et al.,1 several studies have demonstrated that international travel was a major risk factor for the acquisition of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MRE, that we refer here as Enterobacteriaceae that produce an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, a plasmid-encoded AmpC-type cephalosporinase and/or a carbapenemase).2 Very interestingly and despite some slight differences in the recruitment design or microbiological methods used, these studies have roughly reported the same observations and drawn the same conclusions: a travel to regions where MRE have massively spread in the community setting3 strongly predisposes to the acquisition of MRE, and the major underlying risk factors are the occurrence of diarrhoea during the travel, the intake of antibiotics, travel to specific regions (e.g. South-East Asia and the Indian subcontinent) and travelling...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.