The various historical plans for partitioning Palestine—from the Peel Commission Report 1937 to the Oslo Accords 1993—not only divided the land into non-contiguous territories, they also gave rise to a new spatial condition. Between the various territories another space emerged, whose expanse was the very width of the lines separating them. Each partition line reflected the particular cartographic technologies and political conditions of the time, its size a function of the scale of the map on which it was drawn.

Meron Benvenisti famously asked: ‘Who owns the “width of the line?”’ He was referring to the 1948 cease-fire lines between Israel and Jordan. The lines were drawn on a 1:20 000 scale map by the two military commanders—Moshe Dayan and Abdullah al-Tal. They met in an abandoned house in the Musrara district of...

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