Seattle’s popular image has gone through a number of makeovers in the last century: a port town with a civic identity saturated with frontier mythology; a remote and culturally insular working-class city where Boeing employed one out of every four workers in the metropolitan region during the height of the Cold War; and, today, a gentrified tech-industry playground that one singer, referring to Microsoft’s co-founder, derisively calls “Paul Allentown” (1). That Seattle has a history of racial segregation, and of multiracial movements for justice, comes as a surprise to most people. The Pacific Northwest is the region furthest from the U.S. South in the lower forty-eight states. Most black migrants to the far West arrived during and after World War II, and the...

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