The case of A, B, and C v Ireland is the latest in a series of challenges brought against the Irish Government because domestic legislation is argued to be outside of international human rights norms.1 The case involved three women who felt, for different reasons, that their rights under Articles 2, 3, 8, and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) had been breached because they had to travel to Great Britain in order to have a safe and legal abortion. The circumstances of the three individual women were different, but they belong to a large community of women who are forced each year to travel overseas in order to access abortion services, following what Rossiter calls ‘the abortion trail’.2

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The judgement in this case exemplifies the consequences of an approach to abortion regulation where a government ‘chooses’ to facilitate abortion services through ‘delegation and doubt’....

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