In his influential work The Production of Space (1991), Henri Lefebvre argues that “(Social) space is a (social) product. . . . [and] the space thus produced also serves as a tool of thought and of action; . . . in addition to being a means of production it is also a means of control, and hence of domination, of power” (26). US multi-ethnic literature often grapples with these characteristics of social spaces, particularly as they affect identity formation. A compelling example is Harriet A. Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), which demonstrates that intersections of social space and temporality are...

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