With her book, Making Amends, Linda Radzik makes a valuable contribution to a small, but important and rapidly growing body of philosophy on the aftermath of wrongdoing. Radzik focuses mostly on wrongdoers’ obligations to make amends, or ‘atone’, for their wrongful deeds, but also examines victims’ obligations in relation to wrongdoers who attempt to make amends. Chapters two and three (Ch. 1 is the introduction) argue against the two dominant ways of conceiving of atonement: as the restitution or repayment of moral debts; and as the transformation of the wrongdoer, her commitments, or the significance of the past. Chapters four and five develop her positive alternative, whereby atonement aims at the repair of damaged moral relationships. Chapter six extends this moral theory to the political realm, to offer a novel account of restorative justice; and Chapter seven extends the theory to collectives via an argument that...

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