Persons, Interests, and Justice (PIJ) develops and ties together two important areas of normative ethics—individual self-interest and distributive justice. Holtug makes important contributions in both areas, and writes with exceptional clarity and rigour. PIJ overlaps significantly with Derek Parfit’s Reasons and Persons but goes even further in its investigation of the moral significance of individual self-interest, offering what is perhaps the most extensive and systematic exploration of the topic to date.

The book has three main parts. Part I (Chapters 1-4) focuses primarily on the topic of individual self-interest. It contains an extended discussion of what Holtug calls The Identity View, according to which one has a self-interest at time t1 in some individual benefiting at some earlier or later time t2 if and only if one is numerically identical to this individual; and the strength of the self-interest is strictly proportional to...

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