As early as Shakespeare, the stereotypical Jew is denied any special relationship to Western (read: civilized and civilizing) music. The Jew in The Merchant of Venice is devoid of any moral and therefore esthetic sensibility. As Shylock says:

Lock up my doors; and when you hear the drum

And the vile squealing of the wry-neck’d fife,

Clamber not you up to the casements then,

Nor thrust your head into the public street

To gaze on Christian fools with varnish’d faces,

But stop my house's ears, I mean my casements:

Let not the sound of shallow foppery enter

My sober house. (Merchant of Venice, act 2, scene 5)

But just so that we do not miss the message, Lorenzo conveys to Shylock's daughter that her father is insensible to music:

The man...

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