Within the past two years, the Jewish world has mourned the passing of two of the most influential Jewish theologians of our generation: Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein, the Rosh Yeshiva of Yeshivat Har Etzion and a leading student and son-in-law of R. Joseph B. Soloveitchik, and Rabbi Eugene Borowitz, a longtime faculty member at the Hebrew Union College and one of the most influential scholars in the American Reform Movement.

Then as now, there were few contexts in which a Reform and an Orthodox theologian would have engaged in substantive religious dialogue. Yet Borowitz and Lichtenstein’s work intersected in one of the most prominent issues in modern Jewish thought: what is the role of ethics within halachic discourse? Lichtenstein addressed this topic in his 1975 essay, “Does Jewish Law Recognize an Ethic Independent of...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.