“Landscape is not merely the world we see; it is a construction, a composition of that world. Landscape is a way of seeing the world.” 1 So writes Denis Cosgrove in Social Formation and Symbolic Landscape , a work dating from 1984. 2 The potential of landscape, according to Cosgrove, is that it “incorporates far more than merely the visual and functional arrangement of natural and human phenomena.” 3 Similarly, in Landscape and Power , published in 1994, W. J. T. Mitchell interrogates “not just what landscape ‘is’ or ‘means’ but what it does, how it works as a cultural practice.” 4 And in a 2014 review of the existing literature, Yvonne Whelan notes that landscape “as an ideological and dynamic entity … pave[s] the way for a whole range of innovative readings...

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