In the first four decades of the twentieth century, new operettas from the German stage enjoyed great success with audiences not only in cities in Europe and North America but elsewhere around the world.1 The transfer of operetta and musical theater across countries and continents may be viewed as cosmopolitanism in action. The production and reception of these operettas relate to many of the themes that have emerged in recent years concerning the meaning and character of cultural cosmopolitanism, such as the development of non-national affiliations. Cosmopolitan theorizing has become an important means of addressing the new challenges that sociology faces in the twenty-first century, when, as John Brewer puts it, “the very notion of society and ‘the social’ is under challenge from globalization and fluid mobilities and networks of exchange that...

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