The study of print and of print culture was once envisioned as coming together and contributing to each other's limitations. In the late 1980s, the work of Roger Chartier signalled a departure from the familiar divide between print as a new means of dissemination that increased access to texts and transformed European culture through the word, and print as a particular problem within art history, in which its status depended on overcoming associations with technology and reproduction.1 Chartier argued not only for the necessary connection between object, reader, and institutions, but also for the importance of the production of meaning through readings that were contested, incomplete, and creative. By arguing that new kinds of actions and behaviours resulted from a new means of production, print culture opened up new opportunities for the reconsideration of images within art history as a whole.  The advantage of studying images through the autonomous...

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