There are two central philosophical influences on this short and provocative first book by Sylvie Delacroix, Legal Norms and Normativity: an Essay in Genealogy1 : the first is that of constructivism about values, and the second is that of the genealogical method. Both influences are offered as strategies for answering the following question: ‘how can law bind us, if it is contingent upon the changing wills and desires of whoever happens to hold political power?’ 2 Given the fundamental and pervasive importance of these two influences, I begin, in the first two sections of this article, with a discussion of Delacroix's treatment of them. My aim is not to offer a sophisticated philosophical review of the concepts themselves, but merely to convey something of the spirit in which Delacroix uses them. I...

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