The social and cultural history of the mass in the later Middle Ages has received significant scholarly attention over the last few decades. Research has focused especially on the consequences for popular piety of two key doctrines, the mass as an offering or sacrifice for the living and the dead, and the belief that the elements of bread and wine are transformed into Christ’s body and blood by the priest’s consecration. These richly detailed studies make abundant use of anthropological theory to examine the many ways in which the mass shaped popular religious practices, whether by looking at tales of bleeding hosts and other host miracles, describing the processions and other festivities associated with the feast of Corpus Christi, considering the dramatic impact of the priest’s words and gestures when celebrating the mass, or discussing prescriptions for lay devotion during the mass....

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