It is beginning to be rather well known that Edmund Husserl (1859–1938), the founder of phenomenological philosophy, was originally a mathematician; he studied with Weierstrass and Kronecker in Berlin, wrote his doctoral dissertation on the calculus of variations, and was then a colleague of Cantor in Halle until he moved to the Göttingen of Hilbert and Klein in 1901. Much of Husserl’s writing prior to 1901 was about mathematics, and arguably the origin of phenomenology was in Husserl’s attempts to give philosophical foundations first for analysis and later for the formal sciences in general. However, what exactly Husserl’s thoughts about mathematics were is relatively little known. Stefania Centrone’s book Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics in the Early Husserl fills this lacuna. Centrone deciphers Husserl’s early texts about mathematics and logic somewhat selectively, but...

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