This is only the second monograph in English devoted to the logical work of Stanisław Leśniewski (1886–1939). Leśniewski was one of the three pivotal figures of the Warsaw School of Logic (the other two were Jan Łukasiewicz and Alfred Tarski). Of the three, Leśniewski (who was Tarski’s doctoral supervisor) was the most unorthodox and uncompromising in his views. He died at the early age of 53 and his posthumous papers were destroyed in the Warsaw Rising; so his influence has been more muted than it might have been had he or his unpublished work survived. A small coterie of former students and their students interpreted and reconstructed his ideas after the war, but most later developments in logic passed his ideas by. A notable non-Polish admirer was Quine, who met Leśniewski in 1933,...

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