This is a book whose aim, argumentative structure and central claims are as clear as they could possibly be. Its aim is to provide an account of the meaning of the first‐person term I, as well as its ‘formal variants, like me, mine, and my’, where ‘“the meaning” of an expression stands here for its logical character, inferential role, referential function, expressive use, and communicative role’ (p. 2).

The book is divided into two parts. The first presents and criticizes purism, the orthodox position on the meaning of ‘I’, which says that ‘I’ is a pure indexical which refers ‘to the user, directly, and always successfully’ (p. 6). After the historical background that led to purism comes a detailed critical analysis of three ‘myths’ which are said to be at its heart. The second part provides a positive and...

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