In Plato's Utopia Recast (2002) Christopher Bobonich argued that the very striking differences between the ideal cities described in the Laws and in the Republic result primarily from changes in Plato's views about moral psychology. These led Plato to adopt a new conception of virtue with consequent changes to his view of what a truly good city might be like. While this account has certainly not won universal acceptance, it has had the effect of making questions of moral psychology central to discussion of the Laws. The eleven newly‐written essays which make up the present volume reflect this development. While other issues are not ignored, more than half the contributions are devoted to questions of virtue and moral psychology.

The first two chapters consider questions about the aims and audience of the dialogue. Malcolm Schofield, taking a cue from Aristotle, argues that...

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