Abstract

This article examines how issues related to internally displaced persons are integrated into comprehensive peace accords. The question being asked is twofold: Does the inclusion of internally displaced persons issues increase the likelihood for a peace accord’s success? Does the inclusion of internally displaced persons issues into a peace accord increase the likelihood that these issues will be resolved? Using data from the Peace Accord Matrix, this research finds that the inclusion of internally displaced persons issues within an accord does indeed increase its likelihood for success. However, there is less evidence to suggest that the inclusion of such provisions actually leads to the successful resolution of internally displaced persons issues. The article further investigates this issue by examining cases in which a country has pursued internally displaced persons legislation prior to the signing of the final peace accord and finds evidence to suggest that when internally displaced persons issues are addressed outside the parameters of the peace negotiation there is a higher likelihood for success. The implications of these findings are discussed.

You do not currently have access to this article.