In April 2015, civil unrest in Baltimore City in the aftermath of the death of Freddie Gray—an unarmed black man who died in police custody—brought a renewed focus on finding solutions to socioeconomic and political disparities. In cities like Baltimore, where predominantly low-income communities of color face abysmal educational, health, and economic outcomes, it is hard not to point to the vestiges of structural racism, which are both deep-seated and historical. Despite being located within the nation's wealthiest state, nearly half (49.7 percent) of Baltimore City residents have income 50 percent below the poverty level (or $5,385 per individual), whereas the wage to afford housing in the city is $23.69 per hour or over $49,000 per year (Maryland Alliance for the Poor, 2016).

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Given these data, solutions to ameliorate these disparities will not be found overnight. Nor can we assume that...

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