My article “Vulnerable Families as Active Agents of Their Own Change Process: A Bidirectional Perspective” (Goh, 2015), published in this journal, focused on the importance of the strengths perspective (Saleebey, 2013), which guides social workers’ interactions with clients from vulnerable families. I argued that the strengths perspective primarily operates at the ontological level but requires additional specific mid-level conceptual tools regarding human agency and the relationship context of human agency to effectively translate theory into practice. Attention was drawn to social relational theory (SRT), which has an ontological position compatible with a strengths perspective and offers ideas that may guide the understanding of processes underlying the clients’ actions as change agents and those of social workers empowering relationships with clients. In her Points & Viewpoints response to my article, Pamela Joy Miller (2016) raised a number of critiques, including...

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