Continental drift provides a valuable single-volume study of changing British attitudes to Europe since 1945, albeit one that is narrower in focus than its title suggests. Grob-Fitzgibbon’s central thesis is that Britain’s turn to Europe needs to be framed within the context of its changing Cold War relationships and the decline of its empire. The Suez crisis marks the dividing point of the book. Whereas Britain in the late 1940s could be described as a nation of ‘Imperial Europeans’ in which British identity was viewed as both European and imperial, this world view began to be challenged by the growth of European co-operation (in which the UK played little part) leading to the creation of the European Economic Community (EEC) in 1957. Following Suez, Britain’s confidence in its world role was shattered. Subsequently,...

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