The justification for strategies to control major human helminth infections has been clearly set out by Gabrielli et al.1 There is an obvious need to try to reduce infection and morbidity with the ultimate aim of eradication of infections.

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However, experience with helminths of domesticated animals indicates that the development of resistance is an almost inevitable consequence of mass use of anthelminthics. Therefore, it is essential in any control programme that possible development of resistance is monitored and that the efficacy of an anthelminthic in one region is confirmed prior to its mass use. The ability to detect benzimidazole (albendazole) resistance has been made much simpler by the recent publication of Vercruysse et al.2 who have suggested that the expected therapeutic efficacy, as assessed by faecal egg count reduction, should be >95% for Ascaris lumbricoides and >90% for hookworms. There is...

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