Summary

In 1977 and 1978 selected in-patients at the Tegalyoso Hospital, Klaten, Indonesia who had recent onsets of acute fever were serologically studied for evidence of alphavirus and flavivirus infections. A brief clinical history was taken and a check list of signs and symptoms was completed on admission. Acute and convalescent phase sera from 30 patients who showed evidence that a flavivirus had caused their illnesses were tested for neutralizing antibodies to several flaviviruses which occur in South-east Asia. Paired sera from seven patients demonstrated a fourfold rise in antibody titre from acute to convalescent phase. The most common clinical manifestations observed in this series of patients included high fever, malaise, stomach ache, dizziness and anorexia. None of the seven patients had headache or rash despite the fact that headache and rash had been associated with two of the three previously studied. The onsets of illness clustered toward the end of the rainy season when populations of Aedes aegypti, a probable vector in Malaysia, were most abundant.

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