This is an important and useful book, exhaustively researched and well written. Michel Hogue has produced a fine study of the Plains Métis in their homelands, which became partitioned by the U.S.-Canada border. Rooted largely in the old North West Company and the Canadian-based fur trade, this growing population of Indigenous and European descent had come to dominate trade and buffalo hunting in the Red River region and beyond through the mid-nineteenth century. Closely linked through ancestry and kinship to numerous other Indigenous communities, the Métis also forged their own identity through their economic contributions and the ramifying connections that held their settlements and wintering camps together across great distances. Challenges and hard times reinforced their distinctiveness from the 1860s on, as incoming settlers, businessmen, government...

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